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Leah Prencipe, UNICEF Office of Research-Innocenti - I have just returned from rural Tanzania, where I got to see one of the largest social protection programmes in Africa in action. The Productive Social Safety Net provides three types of support to poor and food insecure households:  conditional cash transfers, ‘cash for work’ and livelihood enhancement.


During a recent trip to Ghana, we presented the baseline findings from an impact evaluation of the LEAP 1000 cash transfer programme to UNICEF colleagues, government and development partners. LEAP 1000, an extension of Ghana’s Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty programme, targets households with young children. It is designed to improve the nutritional status of children…


In discussions with stakeholders, there are two gender assumptions we hear repeatedly: 1. giving benefits to women (rather than men) will result in better outcomes – particularly for children 2. transfers will increase women’s empowerment. In other words, paying attention to gender is important not only to deliver better programme results, but also as an…


Social cash transfers are an increasingly popular tool in African national governments’ social protection strategies, but a question that often comes up about their use is will such programmes encourage parents to have larger families in a region with stubbornly high fertility rates?


Cash transfer programs have become an increasingly popular component of social protection strategies across sub-Saharan Africa. These programs provide monthly payments to poor and vulnerable households and can lead to multiple demonstrated benefits, such as the improvement of health and education among young people, and impacting the local economy.