Through the UNICEF Office of Research–Innocenti’s Fellowship Programme, and with generous funding from the Hewlett Foundation and Sida, the Transfer Project works with a select group of talented young researchers from Africa on joint research on national cash transfer programmes. Fellows collaborate with Transfer Project researchers and country evaluation teams, answering a specific research question around the impacts of cash transfers on health, education, or multidimensional poverty utilizing Transfer Project data.

Each fellow spends 2-3 weeks in one of our offices at Innocenti (Florence), FAO (Rome) or UNC (North Carolina) to work on the proposed research and present their past research. During this time, the fellow has access to senior researchers who work as mentors, guiding the conceptualization, analysis and drafting of the study. The remainder of the year-long fellowships are conducted from their home base. Fellows also have the opportunity to present work at international conferences and at the Transfer Project workshop.

OBJECTIVES

Produce an in-depth study examining the effects of cash transfers on a specified topic. Expand the experience of the fellows and enhance their contributions to policy research using national data from the region.

Current Fellows

Michael Danquah

Michael Danquah

PhD, Economics

Michael Danquah is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Economics, University of Ghana, Legon. He is also an International Growth Centre (IGC) researcher and has recently been selected as a Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), Department of Economics, University of Oxford. Michael’s research has focused on informality, inequality and poverty reduction, and productivity growth. As part of his Fellowship, Michael is currently working on a paper “Urban cash transfers, universality, and child poverty in Ghana”.

Mphatso Kamndaya

Mphatso Kamndaya

PhD, Public Health

Mphatso Kamndaya is a Senior Lecturer at University of Malawi–The Polytechnic. Mphatso conducts international empirical research in social science and urban health. He has published on adolescent sexual reproductive health in sub-Saharan Africa, including structural drivers of HIV/AIDS among young people. He has training in applied statistics and mathematics and conducts both quantitative and qualitative research.

Previous Fellows

Fidelia Dake

Fidelia Dake

phD, Population studies

Fidelia Dake is a lecturer at the Regional Institute for Population Studies, University of Ghana. Fidelia’s research interests include population health, nutritional outcomes, socio-environmental determinants of obesity and non-communicable diseases, ageing, social protection and health statistics. During her fellowship, Fidelia examined the impact of unconditional cash transfers on early pregnancy and child marriage among young adults in Zambia and Malawi.

Ramaele Moshoeshoe

Ramaele Moshoeshoe

PhD, Economics

Ramaele Moshoeshoe is a lecturer of Economics at the National University of Lesotho. His research interests are in applied development economics, with a focus on labour economics and economics of education. During his fellowship, he examined the effects of unconditional cash transfers on schooling. He is currently examining the long-term effects of free primary education on student achievement in Lesotho.

Jacob Novignon

Jacob Novignon

phD, economics

Jacob is a lecturer at the Department of Economics, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana. Research interests include health financing, efficiency of health systems, poverty and vulnerability analysis. Current research activities include understanding financial incentives for socioeconomic related inequalities in healthcare utilization in Ghana, and youth unemployment in Africa. During his fellowship, Jacob evaluated the impact of unconditional cash transfers on morbidity and health-seeking behavior in Africa.

Idrissa Ouili

Idrissa Ouili

phD, economics

Idrissa is an assistant professor at the High Institute for Population Sciences at the University of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Research interests include multidimensional poverty analysis, impact evaluation methodology, education and health. During his fellowship, Idrissa worked on the impact of cash transfers and child multidimensional poverty in Malawi. Current research includes socioeconomic determinants of Child Multidimensional Poverty in Burkina Faso.